Tag Archives: night shift

Night Shift #3 – Night Surf…

619i-4slsfl645695221..jpgWord count – 3,200

Night Surf is set in a post-apocalyptic world, and centres around a few young characters who have made a life for themselves on a beach. I know, the post-apocalyptic landscape is one of those genre tropes that every horror writer has to go through at some point. Yes, even me.

We find out that most of the global population has been wiped out by a particularly aggressive strain of flu, and we meet a handful of the teenagers who are left behind as a result of their immunity to the virus. And we don’t really get much else, but that’s all right.

This is an easy read, at least partly because it doesn’t try to do anything outside its wheelhouse. As with many of King’s earlier stories, it is very thin on plot and depth, but in a strange way it is refreshing to read something from him that is this… sparse. It’s short, so there is simply no space to get crazy with any extraneous details.

This is another one I can say yes to, and the best story in Night Shift so far.

Recommended ⇑

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Night Shift #2 – Graveyard Shift…

619i-4slsfl645695221..jpgWord count – 6,100

Although Graveyard Shift certainly feels like an early King story it does have several touchstones that would go on to become hallmarks of his longer and more lauded works – the quick, back and forth dialogue, the grisly descriptions, and the creatures hiding in the darkness.

Not only that, but the style and production of the writing here instantly makes this a more successful excursion than Jerusalem’s Lot, the story that began Night Shift. It’s much shorter as well. Here, King tells the story and gets out… something he does not do as often as he probably should.

Yes, Graveyard Shift is little more than a basic tale of mutated killer rats surviving in the depths of a textile mill – there really isn’t any more to it than that – but when this was originally published King was barely twenty-three years old, so I’ll cut him some slack for the crudity of the writing and the under-developed characters, because I know that he will go on to improve greatly on both of these things.

A much better entry to the collection, and one that I am happy to give the thumbs up to.

Recommended ⇑

Night Shift #1 – Jerusalem’s Lot…

619i-4slsfl645695221..jpgWord count – 12,900

Jerusalem’s Lot is the fairly lengthy short story that kicks off Stephen King’s first collection of short stories, Night Shift, and I’ll say it right now – it’s not one of his best.

It’s designed as a prequel to his second novel, ‘Salem’s Lot, which I barely remember reading all those years ago, but as such this piece suffers because I can’t help but feel as though I’m not getting the whole story here. It’s like going to a restaurant, having a starter, and then walking out before the main course arrives.

Having said that, if ‘Salem’s Lot was written in the same manner as this (and it isn’t), I’d probably not want the entire meal anyway, because Jerusalem’s Lot is told in an epistolary format (as a series of letters). This certainly can be interesting and suspenseful if done correctly and in the right hands, and if King had more experience under his belt when he wrote it, this would have been a lot better, but as it is, this story drags, making you feel every word written on the page.

If you’re coming to this collection looking for King’s strengths, you best dig a little deeper into the book, because you won’t find it here.

Not Recommended ⇓

 

The Short(er) Works of Stephen King…

In an effort to write good short stories I’m going to look towards one of the masters, Stephen King – a guy who has written a fair number of them.

Over the coming months I will be reading and offering my opinion about every short story King has had published in the six collections that are out there: Night Shift (1978), Skeleton Crew (1985), Nightmares & Dreamscapes (1993), Everything’s Eventual (2002), Just After Sunset (2008), and The Bazaar of Bad Dreams (2015).

That’s over 100 stories – some of which I have either forgotten since I came across them many years ago, or not read in the first place. I know not all of them will be good, but I’m sure every one will give me something to say.

… and hopefully I can get it done before he comes out with another anthology.

This (Still) Isn’t Stephen King’s Night Shift…

I’m doing two nights of this, then it’s back to the regular day shifts… that’s if you can count a 4am wake up as regular, of course.

As quickly as the time passed last night, I couldn’t do this permanently. Maybe I would be able to handle it if I was single, but these kind of hours break relationships, no matter how strong you are as a couple.

There is just no time left to spend with your partner. I look forward to the weekends, and I’ve gone and encroached upon this one. I know The Girlfriend© doesn’t like it – I don’t like it either – so after having the next couple of days off so that I can get my sleeping pattern back to some form of normality, I’ll actually be glad to be getting up at my usual, godawful time.

Anyway, back to work.

This Isn’t Stephen King’s Night Shift…

Tonight I am working the night shift, for the first time in… well, a lot of years. I don’t pull all-nighters these days, but doing so brings back fond (and some not so fond) memories of being single in my twenties.

Working through the night is not for everyone. To be honest, it’s not for me either. But as adults, sometimes the choices we have are made for us by others.

The world is a lot less forgiving when the sun is sleeping, and all of that bad stuff feels much more likely when all you can see are shadows.

But there’s always a flip side to the coin, and it can be good for ideas. Inspiration often comes from the darkness, and the shapes that things make when the lights are out.

So… I’ll try to find some material while I’m here.

See you in the morning.